Devouring God’s Holy Word

Posted on April 26, 2021

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By David Ettinger

A Difficult Read
I don’t know about you, but for me the most difficult “read” in the Bible is the Book of Leviticus.

Though I understand that the various sacrifices are a picture of Christ’s sacrificial death on the cross, trying to follow and comprehend the reason for each of the different sacrifices takes much concentration.

I mean, there are burnt offerings, grain offerings, peace offerings, sin offerings, and guilt offerings. And there are specific procedures for each. Then there are the sacrifices Aaron and his sons put forth for their priestly consecration.

Next there are the laws about clean and unclean foods, followed by the purification of women after childbirth. Next there is the variety of laws dealing with lepers and structures and objects tinged by leprosy. This is followed by laws concerning bodily emissions, followed by a bevy of civil laws and regulations.

In essence, everything in Leviticus is a call to holiness among God’s people, as well as an illustration of the character of God. But still, reading Leviticus is quite the endeavor.

And yet …

I Love It!
I love it! Despite the multitude of elements which comprise this intricately detailed book, I love weaving and winding my way through it – even if I have to stop and say to myself, “What was that again? Huh? Wait, let me give it one more read.”

But why? Why do I love the Book of Leviticus so much? And why do I love 1 Chronicles so much – despite its assault of strange and tongue-twisting names? And why do I love the gloom-and-doom books Nahum and Zephaniah so much?

And speaking of gloom and doom, why do I gleefully dive into the Book of Revelation despite its dark forecast about the final years of this era of human history?

And just in general, why do I read a minimum of 8 chapters a day of the Bible, taking me through its entirety twice yearly?

The Answer
The answer is that I love hearing what God has to say. Though there is much to be gained by reading Leviticus, 1 Chronicles, Nahum, Zephaniah, and Revelation, the mere fact that these books are the inspired Word of God is reason enough.

A comparison can be made to a man who after years of marriage is still deeply in love with his wife. He loves being around her, and desires to share her world with her. Perhaps not everything she says is all that earth-shattering, but the fact she is speaking makes the adoring husband’s listening endeavors worthwhile.

Of course, regarding God’s Word , EVERY word is earth-shattering as it is His perfect and precise revelation. How do we know this? 2 Timothy 3:16 tells us: “All Scripture is inspired by God and beneficial for teaching, for rebuke, for correction, for training in righteousness.”

The word “inspired” means “God-breathed.” In other words, though men wrote the Bible in their own style, God, as it were, “dictated” His truths to them. Therefore, when we read the Bible, we read God’s thoughts, laws, commands, historical accounts, and instructions for holy living. We read that which He intended for us to read; that which he desires us to know.

When I watch TV or peruse the Internet, I am consuming what frail humans want me to see, and therefore I dramatically limit my consumption of those “voices.”

Instead of devouring what the world has to say, I devour what God has to say. Though prayer can be more intimate, reading God’s Word in large doses allows me to saturate my being with what He wants me to know.

I’m seeking for more of God and less of the world, and for me, there is no better way to accomplish this than to devour His holy and glorious Word!